astronomy-to-zoology:

Pygmy Falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus)

Also known as the African Pygmy Falcon, P. semitorquatus is a small species of falcon, that occurs in eastern and southern Africa. The population in eastern Africa (P. s. castanotus) occurs from Sudan to Somalia south to Uganda and Tanzania. The population in southern Africa (P. s. semitorquatus) occurs from Angola to South Africa.

True to its common name P. semitorquatus is very small at only 19-20 cm long, making it the smallest raptor in Africa. Pygmy falcons typically inhabit dry bush habitats and will feed on insects, small mammals, birds, and reptiles. Pygmy falcons will usually in the nests of weavers, and even though they feed on bird will rarely go after their weaver neighbors.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Falconiformes-Falconidae-Polihierax-P. semitorquatus

Images: Steve Garvie and Bob

(via aggressively-green)

ichthyologist:

Bichir
Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.
(Polypterus senegalus depicted)
Elma via Wikimedia Commons

ichthyologist:

Bichir

Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.

(Polypterus senegalus depicted)

Elma via Wikimedia Commons

(via scalestails)

buggirl:

Lovely female Spider Wasp.  Ecuadorians call them “Devil’s little horses” in Spanish and I just love that name.  It is so suiting for them, how they fly, and hunt spiders…   I had a brief and unsuccessful attempt at studying them while in Ecuador.

buggirl:

Lovely female Spider Wasp.  Ecuadorians call them “Devil’s little horses” in Spanish and I just love that name.  It is so suiting for them, how they fly, and hunt spiders…   I had a brief and unsuccessful attempt at studying them while in Ecuador.